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Most people, especially those with children, put cell phone safety on top of their priorities. We round up 20 ways on how to use our smart phones safely. This includes advices for keeping your children safe protected when using this device, driving safely while using your cell phone, and everyday tips.
These tips are listed in no particular order of importance. However, they are classified into three main categories to make it easy to locate the advice you are looking for.




Cell Phone Safety Tips for Everyone

1. Careful Information Sharing:  We have to use a good sense about what we post from our phones, as we do from a computer. Connect safely reminds us that posts, texts, photos, and video are tough to take back. Moreover, those can be copied and pasted elsewhere.  
2. Data erase with a swipe: Some apps, like Find My iPhone and Lost, allow you to remotely wipe the phone’s data. These apps will erase your personal data and restore it to its original settings.

This will help keep your passwords, logins, and online accounts safe, in case of your phone being stolen. Amanda Perez said in an article called “Cell Phone Safety Tips for Stolen Devices”.
3. Avoid showing it off: Jessica Dolcourt in a CNET article said that smartphones make good targets. Their size is relatively small size, which makes them easy to snatch and hide. Opt for a basic case to conceal phone’s distinctive markings. It will do more benefit when you keep your smart phone on lower profile.
4. Keep it locked: Have a secret PIN (personal identification number), a password, fingerprint setting or other security measures. National Cyber Security Alliance reminded us to do this, so that only we can access our phones.
5. Call 911 for emergency: A cell phone is one of the greatest tools that can protect yourself and your family in dangerous situations. Help is only three numbers away. Call 911 or another local emergency number in emergencies such as a fire, traffic accident, road hazard or medical emergency. Mize Centers said in his “Cell Phone Safety Tips.”
6. Be careful posting your location at social media: Set your security settings properly on the social networks first. Or, you could just as easily be telling robbers that your house is vacant right now. They will look for important documents to commit identity theft. About Money claimed that “checking-in” may be one of the most reckless cell phone safety errors we can commit.
7. Sign out of your banking app:  Never save your banking app ID on your device. Most apps give consumers the choice to save their ID to that device. If the smartphone or tablet falls into the wrong hands, the thief may have access to sensitive information. This includes balances and critical account numbers. Also, sign out of the app after each session. Most apps automatically sign users out after a set time.  However, it’s safer to sign out immediately after each use.  This is according to Stephen Ebbett on “6 Tips for Avoiding Identity Theft When Mobile Banking, About Money.”
8. Inform your bank in case your phone is lost: Tell your bank if your phone or tablet is lost or stolen. It’s a good idea to alert your bank if your smartphone goes missing. This is especially true when you use it for mobile banking.  The bank can observe your account for suspicious activities. Then, it will set you up with new security measures right away.”  This is an advice again from Stephen Ebbett in “6 Tips for Avoiding Identity Theft When Mobile Banking.”
9. Regular Phone Cleaning:  Our cell phones are really dirty. That’s a fact. They are full of crawling germs and bacteria that can cause acne and even nasty rashes. Don’t take your phone to the bathroom too often. It might also be covered in fecal matter. Amanda Hawkins stated in “5 Ways Your Phone Is Ruining Your Skin.”
10. Give your eyes a break: Eyestrain, blurred vision, dizziness, and dry eyes might result when staring into tiny texts. Make your phone’s font size bigger to avoid eye discomfort. Mark Rosenfield, O.D., Ph.D., told Men’s Health that phone users must hold their phones at least 16 inches away from their faces. Look up from your screen at something far away for short breaks.

Using Your Cell Phone While Driving


11. Cell phone should be within reach while driving: Progressive Cell Phone Safety Tips suggested placing your cell phone within easy reach. In that way, you can grab it without taking your eyes off of the road. Let your voice mail answer a call if it’s inconvenient.
12. Hang up:  PMC Insurance Group reminded us to focus on the road if there is a traffic or heavy rain. These hazardous situations require your full attention. It is better to end your call and focus up.
13. Focus on the road: Don’t look up phone numbers.  Don’t play with your PDA (personal digital assistant) while driving. These activities stop you from keeping your eyes ahead. “Driving is serious business,” AudiologyOnline emphasized in “How to Hear in a Hands-Free World: Mobile and Cell Phone Safety Tips.”
14. Little conversations while driving: Keep conversations short and sweet. Mark Young of SlideShare advised to never use the cell phone for social visiting while you drive.
15. Let someone dial for you: “Ask a passenger to make or take a call for you,”  Forest Agency Insurance said in “Distracted Driving: Using a Cell Phone Behind the Wheel.”

Cell Phone Safety Tips for Your Child


16. Checking child’s cell phone records: “Review cell phone records for any unknown numbers and late night phone calls and texts,” NetSmartz Workshop reminded. Checking their calling and texting records can help you identify warning signs. These might be strange calling patterns or unfamiliar numbers that could indicate that your child is communicating with someone they shouldn’t be such as a potential predator.
17. “Don’t talk to stranger” rule: It’s one thing for adults to choose to answer anonymous calls or text messages. Kids may not always know how to detect a scammer. They may unknowingly reveal personal information that could be used in malicious ways. “An anonymous call could be someone trying to extract personal information. An anonymous text could be phishing,” Rob Zidar stated in “13 Cell Phone Safety Tips for Teens.”
18. Parental control apps: These allow parents to execute ore control over the features and functions their children can use on their smartphones. Using apps like these restrict access to the features you deem safe and appropriate, which can go a long way in keeping your kids safe . “Determine what features your child needs based on his age. Does your 10-year-old really need web browsing capabilities?,” asked Laura Willard in “Cell Phone Safety Tips for Kids, Tweens and Teens.”
19. Being aware of cyberbullying: It is yet another reason to monitor your child’s smartphone usage including call and text message records. Seeing threatening or bullying messages on your child’s phone will allow you to confront issues. These should be addressed as soon as possible before they escalate to dangerous levels. “Cyber bullies, adults and children alike, harass others by sending threatening or rude texts to cell phones,” How Stuff Works tweeted.
20. Limiting child’s time on the phone: Setting clear limits on smartphone usage will help you keep screen time within reasonable limits. “Half an hour of screen time is recommended for children 4-5 years old; an hour for ages 5-10; and two hours for high school aged kids,” Melanie Medina of Identity Force said in “Growing up Digital – Cell Phone Safety for Kids.”
Play it safe by using your device when it’s safe to do so. Avoid calls and texts from anonymous numbers. In this way, you can avoid phishing and other scams. Also, know the proper guidelines using your phone while driving. Learn strategies for monitoring your kids’ cell phone use to stay on top of potential problems. Most importantly, teach your kids about smart mobile usage.
Mendel Mendelovits specializes in finding cost savings in operations, helping other companies set up their eComm. He founded Unlimited Cellular US trusted source for phone batteries, iPhone accessories, and related cell phone accessories in 2001 and he is currently the Chief Marketing Officer of Out of Warranty Franchising since 2009.